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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
the city. many grabbed cameras to catch what appeared to be funnel clouds forming. >> we gotta hurry and get past this. >>reporter: alabama power officials say the winds knocked out electricity to more than 20,000 people across the state. damage was widespread. there were more than 30 reports of tornadoes from texas to alabama. the day got off to a rough start in oklahoma. more than 20 vehicles were involved in an early morning accident that shut down interstate 40 just outside oklahoma city. officials say at least 10 people were taken to hospitals. texas got a double dose of bad weather a.25-year-old man was killed near houston after a tree fell on his pickup. snow covered the ground in longview and turned dallas into a winter wonderland. and blizzard blizzard warnings stretched from arkansas to pennsylvania. i'm ed payne reporting. >>> news time right now 6:31. the people of newtown, connecticut observed christmas with heavy hearts. it's been less than two weeks since the shooting at sandy hook elementary school claimed the lives of 20 children and six adults. a candlelight vigil
for higher tax rates. a woman charged with killing a man a pushing and in front of a new york city subway train is undergoing a psychiatric evaluation. prosecutors say that she pushed the man in front of a train because she thought it would be cool. she reportedly said in the past that she hates hindus and muslims. ♪ families and friends gathered in upstate new york to remember lieutenant michael stefanari. -- chatinari. one man is accused of killing his sister and the two firemen by deliberately setting house on fire. >> he was so generous, loving, and thoughtful. he was my best friend. even though i am surrounded by wonderful people i have an incredibly lonely feeling. my heart is broken, and i'm so thankful for the years we did share. >> two other firefighters were wounded. spangler killed himself. president obama talked about guns during a sunday morning interview. the president told nbc's "meet the press" that the day when 20 children and seven adults were killed in town was the hardest day of his presidency. >> i am skeptical that the only answer is putting more guns in schools. i
that rebels surround the city of damascus which has been an assad stronghold. secretary of state hillary clinton says that bash ar al assad is assad-of- could use chemical weapons to hold on to power and told cbs news, not clear she can negotiate an exit pnd tends to recognize the syrian opposition as the representative of the syrian people next week. that could start to pave the way for them to create a new government. >> very interesting. margaret brennan, thank you noor. >>> in washington this morning, just 26 days left before the fiscal cliff deadline. president obama spoke on the phone with house speaker john boehner on wednesday while his treasury secretary said the white house is, in fact, ready to go straight over the fiscal cliff. major garrett is at the white house. major, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, norah and charlie. later on this afternoon the president will travel across the potomac river to northern virginia to meet a middle-class family to make the self-evident point if the there is a deal and taxes are raised by about $2,000 they'll be
's 300. a big part of that, in my judgment, what has been introduced in new york city, stop and frisk, where the police are allowed to go ahead, look at somebody who they consider suspicious, check and see whether the man has a gun, and that has really made a difference in terms of what's happened in new york. it's not the only thing but one of those factors. interestingly enough, 91% of the people would are shot are people from the minority communities. so they're the ones who are the most -- sadly to stay, one who get the worst of it, the brunt of it. so this is something that i think is absolutely critical in terms of getting gun control across the united states and diminishing the amount of murders. >> but tough same -- you had the same gun law, didn't you, when you had 2400 killed as 400 killed? >> no, we did not. >> you had a new gun law? >> stop and frisk -- >> i'm not talking about stop and frisk. i'm talking gun show -- >> hold on. >> the gun show loophole allows people to sell guns at gun shows without doing the background checks, and there have been no efforts, or no succes
to find it quickly. >> good morning. it's monday, december the 3rd here in new york city. the christmas tree all lit up. with us on set, msnbc contributor mike barnicle, pulitzer prize-winnering historian jon meacham, author of "thomas jefferson." "fortune's" assistant managing editor leigh gallagher and political analyst, former chairman of the rnc, michael steele. and i'm willie geist. joe and mika have the day off today. there's so much to talk about, but we do have to begin with the ties, if we could. it's not just mike. mike's getting all the focus here this morning, and that is inexcusable. >> could i just say, in the words of speaker john boehner, we need to find common ground here, and we need to do it quick. >> there ain't going to be any between these two ties, my man. over here, good news, jon meacham will be number one on "the new york times" best-seller list this weekend. >> hear, hear. >> his book, "jefferson." bad news is he's going to get there wearing that tie with bunny rabbits on it. here they are. could we get a text poll? >> can i just tell you, i got this from haro
're on our way to the only lgbt synagogue in new york city. we're going to meet in the new building although it hasn't been renovated yet. >> where is this place? >> there we go. >> now what you do by coming together in this fashion is by creating a model for others. so that others will know that it's on your shoulders they get to stand. to live the life of complexity and texture and with all of the messiness that it entails. love is possible. you may kiss each other and break the glass. >> maz he will to have. >> i still feel like me. it meant more than me. a lot of more than i thought it would. it's not for everybody. i promise to still fight to change what marriage is as well as its availability to those who want it. >> decades from now, anybody who is supporting doma will feel like a complete fool. we're very happy that more and more people are finally understanding that you're standing on the wrong side of history to support something that denies people civil rights and we know we'll soon be part of our history. >> to love instead of hate. >> everybody should have the ability to hope fo
'malley with the insistence we were ready -- we were ready and resilient. we all said -- punishment on ocean city. that protected $2 billion worth of property because we spend public money to protect private property. that worked. but now we're in to the recovery phase and this, and the response was great. we had heroic people. we were hit by a hurricane, on the shore and coming up our bay all the way to the inner harbor of the port of baltimore and hit by the blizzard in the western part of our state, which is the appalachians. we needed the national guard to respond. we had state troopers and other emergency responders on snow mobiles going in to take care of the elderly and get them out to safety. we did all of that. so now here we are. and now i'm going to just quick word about the shore. you heard what they said. [inaudible] rich in tradition and pride. hard working in -- [inaudible] hit by diesel fuel hit by what they consider unfair government. cash poor, community spirit, my question, and unemployment rate in that area that is in among the highest in the state, think of boot more baltimor
there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over last -- >> 8-to-10 years? guest: if we get rid of land use restrictions, i am optimistic, but if we do not, housing prices will go what, then we will be poised for another big financial crisis. host: john joins us from michigan.
of the southwest and others show that this has blighted development in our towns and cities. the proposal for my colleagues, that we create a long grace. for newly completed buildings, it is a sensible one. and we will introduce it next october. the previous government also plans to increase the small companies tax rates 22%, and we have cut it to 20%. unlike the small and medium-size firms, i want to thank my honorable friend for their help in this area. starting on the first of january and for the next two years. i am therefore going to increase by 10 fold in the annual investment allowance in machinery. instead of 25,000 pounds worth of investment being eligible for 100% relief, 250,000 pounds are not qualified. [cheers] this capital loans will cover cover the total investment undertaken by 99% of all of the business in britain. it is a huge thing to all those who run the business to aspire to grow and expand and create jobs. mr. speaker, i also want britain to have the most competitive tax regime of any major economy in the world. i have already cut the main rates from 20% to 24%, and is exp
. from sydney to new york city. the world turns the page to 2013. good day. i'm chris live in washington in for andrea today. deal or no deal? as vice president joe biden and senate republican leader mitch mcconnell continue negotiations, we just have learned that president obama will speak about the fiscal cliff at 1:30 p.m. eastern time. with all that happening, let's get right to our daily fix. nbc's kelly o'donnell on capitol hill, nbc's kristen welker at the white house, and jonathan capehart, washington post editorial writer and my colleague and an msnbc contributor. okay, kelly. the action is on the hill where it's been for the last few days. let's start with you. this is a fast-moving story. give us the latest perimeters of what appears -- i emphasize appears to be the start of a deal. >> well, it has been coming closer together, so we are told. the question is what will the president be saying, and senior advisors here as well as senators i've spoken to say they do not expect that he is making any nounment of a deal, so we'll wait for the white house to determine that for sure.
they would pick. >> my person of the year is lawrence diprimo, the new york city policeman who bought a pair of shoes for a man with bare feet on a freezing cold day. he reminds us of how important random acts of kindness are. >> president obama, because we're facing some of the biggest challenges in his ability to unify the country or not. it's going to make all the difference in the world. >> the latino american will be the largest minority in this country by year 2020. you cannot win an election in this country anymore without the latino-american. >> the unemployed american worker. just about every single aspect of the president's domestic agenda will deal with unemployment and that group of unemployed voters. >> malala. you have this 15-year-old girl really right in the heart of darkness. as a beacon of light. >> my choice for person of the year is aung san suu kyi. >> curiosity, the mars rover, not just because we are distantly related. >> hillary clinton. she has worked extremely hard and effectively to maintain a sense of calmness and good will around the world. >> i am going to go wi
. let's take a look at the "morning papers." we start with our parade of papers, "the kansas city star." andrea, chime in here. despite a dramatic appearance from 89-year-old former senator bob dole, the senate failed to pass a u.n. disability treaty by just five votes. combat veterans like senators john mccain and john kerry delivered impassioned speeches, but dissenting voters said the treaty could pose a threat to national sovereignty. this is a stretch. more than 150 countries have signed the treaty designed to create unilateral rights for people with disabilities. it's actually based on america's ada act which bob dole helped pass more than 20 years ago. and you know, andrea, watching this american hero on the floor, a guy who is disabled, left part of himself, as he has said and others have said, on the battlefields of western europe, coming in and making a plea. i'm really surprised that this was killed by fringe concerns, fringe, fringe concerns. >> and it was, in fact, his fellow senators, several of the people who served with bob dole, who were the key votes here. and john ke
sm. host: joining us from new york city this morning, mr. fund, i just want to begin, if we could, actually, with the front page of "the washington post." in the news that president obama is looking at proposals on guns. obama asked his cabinet members for ideas to curb violence. what do you make of that? guest: well, we've been this way before. in 1994, president clinton signed an assault weapons ban into law. it expired in 2004. so we have 10 years of experience of what that ban did. and frankly, a university of pennsylvania study looked at all of that said that while there was some slight decrease in the use of assault weapons, it did nothing for overall gun violence. assault weapons, semi-automatics are used between 2% and 8% of crimes and it said the gun ban did nothing to reduce the overall level of gun violence in this country. look, i mean, this is a very tragic situation. and it's a very emotional one. it's at least an emotional issue as abortion or the death penalty. and emotions run high here. and we have a very deeply divided country. we have a large chunk of the count
in a very densely populated region of new york city, long island, and the southern portions of new york state. and so i think it's a stark reminder, a very real example, a very painful outcome that speaks to the need of investing, investing in our infrastructure. and so as we go forward there's also an opportunity to improve upon what existed at the time of these storms. for instance, in the energy networks, utility networks, we can do state of the art. we have taught other nations how to build those systems. it's time to do nation building at home. and i think the beauty here is that while we invest in transportation and other infrastructure, energy infrastructure and water systems and treatment centers and treatment systems and public schools, what we're doing is rippling into the benefits of efficiency, of public safety, of employment and economic development. that is a positive series of dynamics that then lifts the economy and provides for work. 90% of the jobs, it's projected, that come from this sort of infrastructure investment are speaking to middle income households. jobs that
responsibility for what happened in my city was comprehensive and inescapable. citizens held the mayor's office accountable for the prosaic tasks of daily life, like trash collection, fixing potholes in the streets, snow removal, but also for executing strategies for the economic and social advancement of the city. in legislative life, by contrast, we are responsible for positions expressed through votes, cosponsorships, interviews and other means. it takes courage to declare dozens or even hundreds of positions and stand for office knowing that with each position, you are displeasing some group of voters. but we do our country a disservice if we mistake the act of taking positions for governance. they are not the same thing. governance requires adaptation to shifting circumstances. it often requires finding common ground with americans who have a different vision than your own. it requires leaders who believe, like edmond burke, that their first responsibility to their constituents is to apply their best judgment. it is possible to be elected and reelected again and again and gain prominence i
has made a request. yes, is it a hefty $60 billion? but look at who was hit -- a big city that's the heart -- one of the heartbeats of america: new york. and a little community like crisfield. now matter h.j. you live in -- but no matter whether you live in new york city or in crisfield, maryland, you deserve the help of your government. and i say to my colleagues, let's think of the people we were sent here to represent. we weren't sent here to represent a bottom line. we were here to represent people. and i would hope that we would put into place -- that we would pass the president's request. we have great policies that were arrived at. and if you really want to honor senator inouye, let's honor the way his own code of conduct -- a gentle way, a civil way, a consensus builder, a bipartisan builder, and a worker to move this bill. senator inouye chaired the full committee on aeption pros these -- on appropriations these last couple of years. his own staff shared a story with me. and it is relative with me here. he said, i chair the defense committee -- subcommittee,ances and t
cities and towns. in the 11th congressional district which i represent in new york city, the new york city police department reported 274 victims from 226 incidents involving gun violence. and that was in two neighborhoods in the district that i represent. the majority of these crimes were registered in just two communities. 274 victims from 226 incidents. now, fortunately, not everyone perished in these incidents, but one incident leads to many and the repercussions and trauma to those who witnessed these incidents who dooged a bullet in our community, is immeasurable. we have the authority to focus our efforts on penalties for gun trafficking and unlawful sales of firearms. we have the authority to prevent the retail sale of assault weapons and high capacity magazines or clips designed for military combat use and we have the ability to register handguns and microstamp munitions to trace ownership and origin. we have the authority. we only need to have the courage to act. the newtown tragedy has highlighted a vexing issue that we as americans must address. it is imperative that we se
harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and i, i don't, i don't want to argue survival with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living and to see -- to do what i can to see this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us sunday at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> now, a discussion of how the military and national security might be affected by spending cuts scheduled to take effect the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, was joined by the chairmen of the senate house armed services committee. this is a little less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is. peter:rerson -- peterson. i want to give you, first, a review of our foundation and why we are supporting the project you're going to hear about today. starting about 30 years ago a
owner. it is kind of crazy, you know? cities are projecting that in a couple of years they will be worse off now. whenever types of tax forms that we have, i would think that they would be more inclusive, irregardless of your having a home or not having a home, whenever you are doing. i would be willing to pay the sales tax, which would be more pay less. that is about all that i have to say. we need help. host: this is what joseph says on twitter -- host: john, indiana. good morning. caller: we should skip this and let both parties walk away, let the budget control act stand, let sequestration happen. all last year the democrats and republicans complained about having a balanced approach with more taxes and less spending. it is not a cliff, it is just fear mongering. i think we should just let it happen and then get back to the grand party next year. host: as part of that grand bargain, would you give up some tax deductions? caller cannot until i see spending cuts. last year we had the $300 billion budget control act first time cut. they keep just pushing these spending cuts down the roa
much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm bill. we do too much of that around here on -- on other areas of public policy. we should do what we've always done in the senate long before i got here, passing five-year bills with regard to the farm bill. it does create economic opportunities in rural areas. it sustains the consumers and businesses that rely upon our rural economy. the senate-passed farm bill would reduce the deficit by approximately $23 billion through the elimination of some subsidies, the consolidation of programs, and -- and producing greater efficiencies in the delivery mechanisms in programs. now, we're having a big debate about the end of the year a
at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany, saturday at noon eastern on "book tv" on c-span2 and on sunday on c-span3 on american history tv. washington journal continues. host: we want to welcome peter welch, chief deputy whip, also served on the oversight and government reform committee. thanks for being here. the fiscal cliff negotiations, the house gop put out their proposal yesterday. "usa today" has -- reaction?r guest: i disagree. on the revenue, with the speaker has proposed with $800 billion, there's no great increase. so-called cleaning up the tax code. the problem is you start going into the middle class and start having the middle class pay more money. on the revenue there is how much do we raise and where does it come from. had alear president obama specific proposal to raise the rates to the clinton era for the top two%. i think that is what will happen. there was a majority of republicans who agreed with that. second, on the 1.1 trillion entitlement cuts, that is really a bad idea. what is doing is approaching that by slashing benefits rather than reformi
the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany, on c-span to and it c-span3. span3.c- [bell rings] >> this weekend on c-span3, follow harry truman's eldest grandson to hiroshima. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. survivalant to argue or about the history. i think we are past that. my goal for behing here is to honor the dead nand listen to the living and do what i can to ensure this does not happen again. >> he will discuss meetings with bomb survivors. sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. host: armstong williams, how do you see the fiscal cliff negotiations going? where do you see them going? guest: there is no doubt that the president signaled yesterday in his conversation to the speaker of the house, and no matter what the drumbeats of the politicians and activists may say to the media, there is no question he is committed to resolving this issue. you cannot resolve this issue bringing people back to certainty or to help business owners understand the liabilities they will face on january 1, 2013. there
in this city. and we've been talking with several different authors. and we want to introduce you to another author right now, and it's wendy mcelroy whose book is called "the art of being free: politics versus the every man and woman." wendy mcelroy, first of all, tell us about yourself. >> guest: well, i'm an individualist feminist, i'm an individualist anarchist. i've been active in libertarianism for about 40 years now. i've been writing since i was 15 years old. this book is my reaction to 9/11, basically. when 9/11 happened, i started to rethink everything about libertarianism and everything about my belief system. i wondered had i wasted my life to working freedom for the decades i have because i saw a police state arise so quickly after 9/11. and so effortlessly. it seemed no one resisted it. it seemed that america gave up on freedom all at one moment. and i did a lot of thinking about my relationship to the state, what the state was, how important it was to my life and how the main thing that responsibility of life, if you want, is what henry david thoreau used to call the business
worked for the president and progressive causes and began in 2008 when he performed in five cities in north carolina and. his efforts generated thousands of volunteers and helped win the state for the democrats for the first time since 1976. the last year has been a busy for them on the campaign trail, over 50 radio and television interviews and 40 events, from concerts' and field offices to opening the final night of the democratic national convention. just yesterday, he helped brighten up washington, d.c. by performing at the lighting of the national christmas tree. his music was with us as we celebrated the season, our family and country. i would like to welcome james taylor. [applause] >> thank you, bill, thank you, susan, for the cupcakes. i got a fire one myself. mighty tasty. you know, i titled this thing today election reform because i thought i needed to have a title. i probably know less about election reform then pretty much everybody in the room. i will talk a little bit about it toward the end. really, what i wanted to do it is described a pilgrim's progress through th
in baltimore -- you have been there many times yourself. you know it is a city known for his row houses, not for its rodeos. kay invited me to come into the rodeo in the astrodome. with i showed up, to her surprise -- well, i showed up, to her surprise. i had little boots on, a cowgirl hat and a vest. she put me in a buckboard and deep in the heart of texas we circled the astrodome together. i was in a buckboard. she was in a pall m palomino neo me. at the end of the evening, i was there munching on barbecue, affectionately called buckboard barb, and that's the kind of thing -- and i have the pictures to show it. they're locked up. i don't widely distribute them much but it was a heck of an evening. i say that because, again, out of that comes great friendships that also lead to smoothing the way, not paving -- actually, not smoothing the way -- paving the way, where we put our heads together to solve our national problems, a understand t and toy where we get the best ideas from a variety of approaches. and at the end of the way, we feel better but america is better off. i'm really -- i
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)